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Finishes #2 and #3..........

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Finish #2 for January.
I finished the hand stitching last night on the binding of this batik Bento Box quilt.  It is 56.5" x 80".  There isn't a pattern for this version.  I just used measurements that I wanted to make the blocks.  Here is a mini tutorial on the way I assembled the blocks. 




I bought the batik that I used for backing on sale a few years ago.

















Finish #3 for January.  I finished the machine stitched binding on this batik Trip Around the World last night too.  It has 120 different fabrics, 5 different fabrics for each color ring.  Here is a post about mug rugs where I explain how I do the binding.  The only difference is that I cut the strips wider for a large quilt and sew it on with a 3/8" seam. 


The batik backing is another good sale purchase.  The quilt is 66" x 91". 

This post shows the fabric choices and the size of the pieces when I was first working on it.








The vertical line quilting drew it in about 3.5" in width.
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skittone
2 minutes ago
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First quilt is very cool.
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Don’t install that

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Oh look, a security update! Don't install that!

Security updates weaken your phone. They can even destroy it!

Are you joking, doctor? Of course I'm joking!

Can we get back to our discussion? Sure!

You were telling me about how vaccines cause autism.


Don't miss our next comic:

The post Don’t install that appeared first on Fredo and Pidjin. The Webcomic..

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gabrielgeraldo
11 minutes ago
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São Paulo
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Photo

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gabrielgeraldo
13 minutes ago
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São Paulo
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The Most Popular Theory About What Causes Obesity May Be Very Wrong

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You've heard it over and over again: The obesity crisis, which affects more than a third of US adults and costs the country hundreds of billions of dollars every year, is due to the fact that people eat more calories than they expend. In other words, one of the leading causes of preventable deaths is rooted in gluttony and sloth. If people jogged more and ate fewer Big Macs, they wouldn't get obese.

What if that idea is just wrong? Gary Taubes thinks it is. Taubes joined us on the most recent episode of Bite to talk about the flaws in this popular idea of how we get fat.

 

As a journalist and author, Taubes has devoted his career to understanding how what we eat affects our weight. Taubes sees serious flaws in the "energy-balance theory"—that you just have to eat less and move more to stave off the pounds—and thinks that the idea is seriously undermining the fight against obesity. The more nutritionists and doctors promote that theory, he argues, the more they avoid talking about what Taubes sees as a more convincing cause of our public health woes: sugar.

Taubes traces the roots of the energy-balance theory in his new book, The Case Against Sugar. In the 1860s, German scientists invented a calorimeter which measured how many calories a person consumed and then used up. This innovation helped inform the "new" nutrition science of the early 1900s: "You could measure the energy in, you could measure the energy out," Taubes explains. "Clearly if someone was getting fatter, they were taking in more energy than they expended. From this came this theory that obesity was an energy-balance disorder."

But in the 1960s, researchers developed radioimmunoassay, allowing them to measure the circulation of hormones in the blood. Scientists could soon establish how hormones regulate the fat we accumulate, and how the food we eat influences those hormones. But at that point, notes Taubes: "The obesity and nutrition community continues to say, 'look, we know why people get fat: It's because they take in more calories than they expend.'"

That stubborn theory—Taubes sarcastically deems it "the gift that keeps on giving"—prevails even today. As my colleague Julia Lurie pointed out in this story, junk food companies use this idea in order to peddle sugary foods to kids. In one lesson of Energy Balance 101, a curriculum backed by companies like Hershey and PepsiCo and taught to 28 million students and counting, students learn that going for a bike ride can balance out munching on a chocolate bar.

The problem with this mentality, Taubes and numerous doctors and scientists argue, is that it ignores the way certain ingredients play a unique role in the way our bodies develop fat. Sugar is metabolized differently, and it doesn't trigger the hormone that tells us when we're full. Doctor Robert Lustig argues that too much sugar causes metabolic syndrome, a condition linked to heart disease, diabetes, and other chronic illnesses.

So if obesity isn't an energy-balance disorder, but is rather a metabolic defect, says Taubes, "you have to fix the hormonal thing." And "the way you start fixing it is you get rid of all the sugar in your diet."

Taubes realizes all of this is such a bummer to swallow. He's written a book that's "the nutritional equivalent of stealing Christmas," he writes. So I wanted to know, if not sugar, what's his vice? You'll have to listen to the episode to find out.

Bite is Mother Jones' podcast for people who think hard about their food. Listen to all our episodes here, or subscribe in iTunes, Stitcher, or via RSS.

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JayM
23 minutes ago
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Atlanta, GA
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When The Brain Scrambles Names, It's Because You Love Them

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I know that name is here somewhere.

If your mom had to run though the name of everyone in the family, including the dog, before hitting yours, it's probably because you're all in a mental folder labeled "loved ones."

(Image credit: Alex Reynolds/NPR)

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JayM
24 minutes ago
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Atlanta, GA
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Trash

3 Comments and 7 Shares
Plus, time's all weird in there, so most of it probably broke down and decomposed hundreds of years ago. Which reminds me, I've been meaning to get in touch with Yucca Mountain to see if they're interested in a partnership.
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JayM
25 minutes ago
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Ha! Love the hover text.
Atlanta, GA
tante
25 minutes ago
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Trash
Oldenburg/Germany
popular
17 minutes ago
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1 public comment
Covarr
4 hours ago
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Don't be silly, Aslan can traverse worlds whenever and however he wants. Interdimensional travel is one of the perks of being God, I hear.
Moses Lake, WA

Saving you bandwidth through machine learning

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Photographers of all specialities, skills and genres have long made their home on Google+, sharing their work with a supportive community. Whether it’s of toys, travel or street art, each photo has a unique story to tell, and deserves to be viewed at the best possible resolution.

Traditionally, viewing images at high resolution has also meant using lots of bandwidth, leading to slower loading speeds and higher data costs. For many folks, especially those where data is pricey or the internet is spotty, this is a significant concern.

To help everyone be able to see the beautiful photos that photographers share to Google+ in their full glory, we’ve turned to machine learning and a new technology called RAISR. RAISR, which was introduced in November, uses machine learning to produce great quality versions of low-resolution images, allowing you to see beautiful photos as the photographers intended them to be seen. By using RAISR to display some of the large images on Google+, we’ve been able to use up to 75 percent less bandwidth per image we’ve applied it to.
How RAISR works

While we’ve only begun to roll this out for high-resolution images when they appear in the streams of a subset of Android devices, we’re already applying RAISR to more than 1 billion images per week, reducing these users’ total bandwidth by about a third. In the coming weeks we plan to roll this technology out more broadly — and we’re excited to see what further time and data savings we can offer.

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jepler
3 hours ago
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fractal compression is reborn using the new buzzword of the day! yay!

anyway the real news here is: holy cow look how bad google's image resize algorithm does at keeping colors the same in the original and the resized image; the water in the UL corner is totally different color in the original vs the 1/4 and RAISR'd images, for instance..
Earth, Sol system, Western spiral arm
DMack
4 hours ago
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We've seen what their machine learning can do. How can we trust it not to turn all the surf boards into snakes and bugs?
Victoria, BC
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