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Write 8-bit console and arcade code in your browser #Gaming #VintageComputing @8bitworkshop

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8bitworkshop is a slick way to write assembly language code to target a number of classic computers and game consoles. The number of platforms rane from the classics to verilog FPGAs with classic cores.

All editing and emulation is in browser, no software to install.

See 8bitworkshop for details.

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jepler
1 hour ago
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interesting
Earth, Sol system, Western spiral arm
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Surveillance as a Condition for Humanitarian Aid

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Excellent op-ed on the growing trend to tie humanitarian aid to surveillance.

Despite the best intentions, the decision to deploy technology like biometrics is built on a number of unproven assumptions, such as, technology solutions can fix deeply embedded political problems. And that auditing for fraud requires entire populations to be tracked using their personal data. And that experimental technologies will work as planned in a chaotic conflict setting. And last, that the ethics of consent don't apply for people who are starving.

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cjmcnamara
1 hour ago
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Taking a Full Photo of the Earth Every Day

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This is a really cool visualization of how Planet’s 150+ imaging satellites take a complete satellite photo of the Earth every single day.

Planet Satellites Daily

Every few seconds, the visualization picks a new satellite to track, allowing you to see the location, height, and speed. The satellites are 300 miles from the surface of the Earth moving at about 17,000 mph.

Tags: infoviz   maps   satellite imagery
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silentpark
2 hours ago
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Hamburg, Germany
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The Gerrymandered Font

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Gerry Font

Gerry is a typeface where the letterforms are created from heavily gerrymandered Congressional districts. For example, the letter U is the 4th district in Illinois:

Gerry Font 02

Click through to download the font for free and to tweet at your representative to stop gerrymandering.

Tags: design   maps   politics   typography
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silentpark
2 hours ago
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Hamburg, Germany
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Urban Nudges

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Urban Nudges is a site that documents small efforts by cities and the people who live in them to slightly change the behaviors of their inhabitants in some way. A 2008 book by Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein defines a nudge as “any aspect of the choice architecture that alters people’s behavior in a predictable way without forbidding any options or significantly changing their economic incentives”. That sounds a bit academic but some examples from the site clarify things. For instance, protected bike lanes encourage bike riding:

The study “Lessons from the Green Lanes: Evaluating Protected Bike Lanes in the U.S.” was conducted in eight protected bike lanes in Austin, Chicago, Portland, San Francisco, and Washington, DC and the major findings were that bike lanes induced new bikers, mostly because they feel safer about the experience.

The researchers interviewed 2,283 cyclists using the bike lanes and found out that nearly ten percent of the users would have taken another mode of transportation if the bike lane hadn’t existed and around one percent of the interviewed said they would not have taken the trip at all.

Dancing zebras in Bolivia cajole motorists into minding crosswalks and other rules of the street:

Zebra Bolivia

Inspired by the Colombian experience, in Bolivia the Department of transportation developed a program where urban educators get dressed as zebras, teaching children and adults urban values through empathy and comedy. The project’s initial concept was to teach pedestrians and drivers the appropriate use of the pedestrian crossing and reduce congestion: urban zebras rejoice when pedestrians wait for green light and grab their head in agony when pedestrians jaywalk. Empathy, humility and comedy made them popular.

A speedometer in Amsterdam raises money for the neighborhood when drivers do the speed limit:

Every driver that passes by the speedometer below the speed limit of 30 km per hour raises EUR0,03 for the neighborhood. “The city’s slogan: Max 30 — Save for the Neighborhood” (Pop Up City). The money raised by this initiative is granted by the city of Amsterdam and is meant to be invested in local community projects.

What kind of nudges could you imagine in your town or city?

Tags: books   Cass Sunstein   cities   economics   Nudge   Richard Thaler
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silentpark
2 hours ago
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Hamburg, Germany
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The Restaurant of Mistaken Orders

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The servers at The Restaurant of Mistaken Orders, a series of pop-up restaurants in Tokyo, are all living with dementia, which means that you might not receive what you ordered.

All of our servers are people living with dementia. They may, or may not, get your order right.

However, rest assured that even if your order is mistaken, everything on our menu is delicious and one of a kind. This, we guarantee.

“It’s OK if my order was wrong. It tastes so good anyway.” We hope this feeling of openness and understanding will spread across Japan and through the world.

At the first pop-up, 37% of the orders were mistaken. This video explains a bit more about the concept and shows the restaurant in action.

Tags: food   Japan   medicine   restaurants   video
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silentpark
2 hours ago
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Hamburg, Germany
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1 public comment
ScottInPDX
22 hours ago
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I admit I cried a little watching this. It's a brilliant idea, and such a great way to bring a community together.
Portland, Oregon, USA, Earth

Anonymous “Anonymous Cowards” are, for now, not welcome on Slashdot

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On August 9, tech news aggregator Slashdot quietly removed one of its earliest features, which had been available to all visitors since its founding in 1997: the ability to post comments as an "Anonymous Coward." And while the feature returned within five days, it returned in a largely nerfed format.

Users can now only access the "Anonymous Coward" feature if they are logged in with a valid account, thus attaching some form of tracked use for anybody on the site. Slashdot administrators say this change is currently "temporary."

“Absolutely, only” meant to combat spam

The decision comes after a surge of public pressure against anonymous imageboard services—particularly 8chan, where a deadly shooter's manifesto was apparently posted. That pressure prompted cloud provider Cloudflare (and other replacement services) to stop offering services to the sites.

In an email interview, Slashdot president Logan Abbott says that the decision has nothing to do with Cloudflare's moves to cut ties with 8chan, Daily Stormer, or other controversial sites. Instead, he says the change is "absolutely, only" meant to combat spam.

"The spam was simply too great and coming from extremely dedicated trolls," Abbott says, and he points to large walls of text and SEO spammers as some of the site's most notorious posters. Abbott says he isn't sure why anyone would think they have a "right" to post on someone's website anonymously. He also points to Slashdot's account-creation process currently requiring a bare minimum of personal details, though creating an account does require a verified email address and tracks the user's IP address.

Abbott claims that the move is meant to make the site's existing moderation system more productive. Slashdot's community largely serves as moderators, and users with a high "karma" ranking at the site are more likely to be granted "mod points" upon logging in. These points can be spent on a limited number of votes to either promote or bury other users' comments, all while assigning values such as "insightful," "funny," "overrated," or "flamebait."

Thanks to an apparently rising amount of spam, most Slashdot users were spending most of their mod points on downvoting spam instead of moderating legitimate user comments, Abbott says.

“Technically, that’s informing them”

Community members certainly noticed the change, though without an official announcement post to discuss it, they took it upon themselves to raise the issue in otherwise unrelated Slashdot threads.

One angry user erupted within a thread about "the golden age of open source," to which Slashdot user thereitis commented, "I think disabling anonymous commenting will have more benefits than drawbacks (for example, giving those who run the site more important things to work on than preventing hateful or troll spam) and it was the right call. Certainly better than requiring a captcha for every post."

"The improvement in quality of discussion so far speaks for itself," Abbott says.

Interestingly, if you disguise yourself as an "Anonymous Coward" for a particular post, its resulting karma score won't affect the primary, connected account. As far as a lack of public announcement about the change, Abbott tells Ars: "We didn't make some grand announcement because this is temporary. Seeing how it goes for a week or two. If someone tries to post anonymously, it displays a message saying it's been disabled. Technically, that's informing them."

A 2016 public poll at Slashdot asked its readers, "Should Slashdot remove the ability to post anonymously?" The results from 13,669 responders was a resounding "No" at 71%. "Yes" and "All my posts are written by Cowboy Neil" (a Slashdot in-joke) came in at 13% and 14%, respectively.

Former Slashdot contributor Jon Katz wrote a lengthy defense of the site's Anonymous Coward feature in 1999. In addition to the regular defense of anonymous online speech as an enabler for whistleblowing, Katz went so far as to say, "maybe out of self-delusion, I equate flaming with being interesting."

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acdha
3 hours ago
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As someone who remembers when Slashdot first launched, I’m going to feel old every time someone asks how anyone could ever have believed that anonymity could work at internet scale.
Washington, DC
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